Century Egg Congee is a classic Chinese dish that I always crave when I’m sick or in need of a comforting meal. White rice is simmered in water until it reaches a soft texture and then served with marinated pork and century eggs. Included in this post is my version of this simple dish that takes just over 1 hour to make and tips on how to use different proteins.

Century Egg Congee with Pork

One dish that I always crave when I’m sick is century egg congee. This is a classic Chinese restaurant dish that is characterized by mushy rice served with pork and thousand year old eggs. The best part of this dish is the thousand year old eggs. They are not LITERALLY a thousand years old, but they definitely look like it with their almost black coloring. I have wanted to make my own version of this congee for so long, and I finally developed a recipe I love. This is not the traditional way to make this dish, but the adjustments I make really bring out the best flavors.

Century Egg Congee with Pork

What is Century Egg Congee?

Congee is a very popular dish in Southeast Asia, especially China where it originates. It is made of rice that’s been simmered in water until it reaches a mushy texture. Because of its consistency, it is easy for the body to digest and is often served to someone when they’re sick or in need something comforting. It is a simple dish that has many variations depending on who’s making it. Congee can be served as is or with different proteins. Some of my favorite kinds of congee include chicken congee made with boiled chicken and turkey congee made with leftover Thanksgiving turkey. Century Egg Congee is typically served with pork and thousand year old eggs (or century eggs).

In a traditional Century Egg Congee recipe, the rice is first simmered until the preferred consistency. The pork and eggs are then added and cooked in the heat of the congee. For my recipe, I made a few adjustments to boost the flavor of the congee. First, I seared the pork to develop more flavor. I then sautéed the dry rice in the leftover oil to add more flavor the rice. To further add more flavor, I substituted some of the water with chicken broth. All of these changes are pretty small, but they add a ton of flavor to the final dish.

Thousand year old eggs or century eggs on a blue plate.

Ingredients, Substitutions & Adjustments

  • Jasmine rice – I used white jasmine rice for this recipe. I think any kind of long grain white rice would work for this recipe. However, keep in mind that every kind of long grain rice, even the same kind of rice from different brands, may cook differently. You might need to add more water, less water, or even change the time you cook the rice.
  • Pork shoulder – I used pork shoulder for this recipe, but you can also use pork butt.
  • Soy sauce and oyster sauce – Adds umami flavor to the pork. I used low sodium soy sauce and regular oyster sauce for my recipe. Soy sauce can be substituted with tamari, which is also gluten free. Oyster sauce can be substituted with vegan oyster sauce, some of which are gluten free. Lee Kum Kee Vegan Oyster sauce is gluten free, but not every brand makes gluten free oyster sauce. If you can’t find gluten free oyster sauce, you can also substitute with an equal amount of soy sauce.
  • Sesame oil – Adds flavor to the sauce and helps the pork get a nice sear. Sesame oil can be substituted with vegetable oil or olive oil, but it won’t contribute the same amount of flavor to the pork.
  • Chicken broth and water – The rice will be simmered in a combination of chicken broth and water. I used low sodium chicken broth for this recipe because I like to control the amount of salt in the congee. Beef broth and vegetable broth can be used as substitutes for chicken broth, but they will change the flavor of the dish.
  • Thousand year old eggs – Thousand year old eggs or century eggs are essentially fermented eggs made by preserving them in clay, ash, salt, quicklime, and rice hulls for several weeks to months. They can be made with chicken, quail, or duck eggs. I used duck eggs for my recipe. You can find them at Asian grocery stores or from delivery services like Weee.
  • Ginger – Adds more flavor to the dish.
  • White pepper – Adds flavor to the dish. I like using white pepper because it gives the congee a more authentic flavor. You can use black pepper, but the taste will be different.
  • Salt for seasoning
  • Cilantro and green onion – Adds freshness to the dish. Feel free to leave out if you don’t like one or both of these ingredients.

How to make Century Egg Congee

First, prep your rice. Rinse rice until the water runs clear (3-4 times). Combine 1/4 pound of pork shoulder, 1 tsp soy sauce, and 1 tsp sesame oil in a bowl. Mix and marinate for 15 minutes.

Heat 2 tsp of vegetable oil (or olive oil) over medium high heat in a large soup pot. Cook pork for 2-3 minutes until seared on both sides. Set aside. In the same pot, add the rice. Saute for 1-2 minutes until the rice is light brown. Add 2 cans of chicken broth and 3 cups of water to the pot. Bring to a simmer and cook for 1 hour.

While the congee is cooking, prep your other ingredients. Cut 2 thousand year old eggs, 1 tbsp ginger, cilantro, and green onion. Set aside in the fridge. When there are 5 minutes left in the cook time, add the marinated pork shoulder, ginger, 1/2 tsp of white pepper, and 1 tsp of salt to the pot. Mix and finish cooking. Once done cooking, taste the congee for seasoning. If it tastes bland, add more salt. Ladle the congee into bowls. Top with cilantro and green onions and serve! Optional: Drizzle some chili oil on top for extra flavor.

Century egg congee with pork in a bowl.

Tips on how to make the perfect Century Egg Congee

Adjust cook time to achieve the texture you want

Making congee is a very personal thing. Everyone has a different preference for their congee texture. Some people prefer it more mushy. Some prefer it less mushy. If you want a more mushy congee, add more water and cook it longer. If you want a less mushy congee, use less water and cook it for less time.

How to customize for different proteins

This congee can be customized for so many different proteins. Pork can be substituted with chicken, beef or tofu. You can use the same marinade and process to make it with these 3 different proteins. If you don’t want to bother with marinating and cooking a protein, use a store bought rotisserie chicken. This is also a great recipe for leftover roasted chicken. Another protein you can use as a topping is cha lua. If you have some leftover cha lua, throw it in there at the end. It tastes absolutely amazing!

How do you store Century Egg Congee?

Store this dish in an airtight container for up to 3 days in the fridge.

Century Egg Congee with Pork

Did you make this dish?

If you made this dish, I would love to see!

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Century Egg Congee with Pork

Get the Recipe:
Century Egg Congee with Pork

Coming together in just over an hour, this easy, comforting congee recipe is served with century eggs and marinated pork.
5 from 5 ratings

Ingredients
 
 

Instructions
 

  • First, prep your rice. Rinse rice until the water runs clear (3-4 times).
  • Combine ¼ pound of pork shoulder, 1 tsp soy sauce, and 1 tsp sesame oil in a bowl. Mix and marinate for 15 minutes.
  • Heat 2 tsp of vegetable oil (or olive oil) over medium high heat in a large soup pot. Cook pork for 2-3 minutes until seared on both sides. Set aside.
  • In the same pot, add the rice. Saute for 1-2 minutes until the rice is light brown.
  • Add 2 cans of chicken broth and 3 cups of water to the pot. Bring to a simmer and cook for 1 hour.
  • While the congee is cooking, prep your other ingredients. Cut 2 thousand year old eggs, 1 tbsp ginger, 2 tbsp of cilantro, and 2 tbsp of green onion. Set aside in the fridge.
  • When there are 5 minutes left in the cook time, add the marinated pork shoulder, ginger, ½ tsp of white pepper, and 1 tsp of salt to the pot. Mix and finish cooking.
  • Once done cooking, taste the congee for seasoning. If it tastes bland, add more salt.
  • Ladle the congee into bowls. Top with cilantro and green onions and serve! Optional: Drizzle some chili oil on top for extra flavor.

Notes

  1. If you want a more mushy congee, add more water and cook it longer. If you want a less mushy congee, use less water and cook it for less time.
  2. Pork can be substituted with chicken, beef or tofu. You can use the same marinade and process to make it with these 3 different proteins. If you don’t want to marinate and cook a protein, use a store bought rotisserie chicken.
Serving: 1bowl, Calories: 175kcal, Carbohydrates: 29g, Protein: 7g, Fat: 3g, Saturated Fat: 1g, Polyunsaturated Fat: 1g, Monounsaturated Fat: 1g, Cholesterol: 15mg, Sodium: 1287mg, Potassium: 147mg, Fiber: 1g, Sugar: 1g, Vitamin A: 47IU, Vitamin C: 1mg, Calcium: 28mg, Iron: 1mg
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