matcha macarons

It has been one crazy week. I got to LA last Saturday and every day has been a deluge of unpacking, catch up on work, and acclimating to my new surrounding. With so much change this week, I wanted to make something familiar on the blog. That’s where these matcha macarons come in. I just learned how to make macarons a few weeks ago, and now I want to make them all the time! They are of course always always ALWAYS a challenge, but when you finally nail it, it’s really satisfying.

meringue

Ingredients, Substitutions & Adjustments

There are almost no substitutions for this recipe because macarons are very finicky. You really have to follow the recipe exactly to get the desired result.

Macaron Cookie

  • Egg whites – Whipped egg whites give the meringue volume. Make sure to use room temperature egg whites for the best results.
  • Granulated sugar – Adds sweetness to the meringue.
  • Cream of tartar – Cream of tartar provides structure to the meringue and helps it maintain its stiff peaks.
  • Powdered sugar – The is the main dry ingredient of the macaron. It also adds sweetness to the cookie. Make sure to sift the powdered sugar.
  • Almond flour – Make sure to use extra fine almond flour for these macarons. If you can’t find fine almond flour, run the almond flour through the food processor a few times before using.
  • Matcha powder – Gives the macaron cookie its green color and matcha flavoring. The most common question I get asked is why my matcha dishes are such a vibrant green color, and the answer is the QUALITY of the matcha. High quality culinary grade matcha holds its color way better in the oven, and the taste is more pronounced. That’s why I swear by Aiya culinary grade matcha powder. I don’t think I could ever go back to another matcha brand. Use cookingtherapy10 to get 10% off your purchase.

Vanilla Buttercream

  • Unsalted butter – I used unsalted, room temperature butter for this recipe. I would highly recommend unsalted butter to help control for the amount of salt.
  • Powdered sugar – This is the main dry ingredient of the buttercream.
  • Vanilla paste – I switched it up this time and decided to use vanilla paste. The flavor is so much better than vanilla extract, and I love those little vanilla specs you get in the buttercream. Good substitutes for vanilla paste are an equal amount of vanilla extract or 1 vanilla bean.
  • Whole Milk – Milk helps loosen up the batter a bit. I like to use full fat whole milk.

Making my matcha macarons

Making the macaron batter

The first step is to make your macaron cookies. Sift the powdered sugar, almond flour, and matcha powder into a bowl. Mix until combined and set aside. Next make your meringue. Use a hand mixer or stand mixer to whisk your eggs until soft peaks and small bubbles appear. Add the cream of tartar and 1/3 of the granulated sugar. Continue whisking and adding the sugar little by little. Whisk the eggs until you get a meringue with stiff peaks and a shiny white color. The best way to know if your meringue is done is to invert the bowl. If it doesn’t fall out, the meringue is done. I would also be careful not to over beat the meringue. You want it to just reach stiff peaks.

Sift the almond flour mixture into the meringue. Use a spatula to fold the almond mixture into the meringue. Be careful not to deflate the meringue too much or over mix. The mixture is adequately combined once it has the consistency of molten lava. The best way to test if the mixture is done is to draw an 8 with the mixture.

Piping and baking the macaron cookies

Fill a piping bag with the mixture. Place a silicone mat on a baking sheet. Pipe circular discs that are ~1 inch in diameter. It’s best to use a silicone mat with a macaron template to guide your piping. After piping, smack your baking sheet on a flat surface 2 or 3 times to get rid of air bubbles. Let the macarons rest for 40 minutes at room temperature. Resting will allow the macarons to form a skin, so when you touch it, no batter comes off.

Preheat the oven to 300 degrees F. Once the macarons have rested and formed that skin on the outside, bake them for 15-17 minutes in the center of the oven. The macarons are done if you can easily lift them off the silicone mat. If it sticks, that means it’s under baked. Throw it back in the oven for 1-2 minutes and check again.

Putting these matcha macarons together

Cool macarons for at least 30 minutes after baking. While the macarons are resting, making the filling. Combine butter, milk, and vanilla paste in a bowl. Use a hand mixer to whisk until a fluffy, smooth mixture forms. Add the powdered sugar and whisk until combined. Now it’s time to put together your macarons! Use a piping bag or Ziploc bag to pipe the filling onto the flat side of 1 cookie. Put another cookie, flat side down, on top of the filling. Repeat this process until the cookies or the filling is used up.

piped filling

Tips on how to make the perfect matcha macarons

Ingredient measurement and oven temperature

  1. Use an oven thermometer – Temperature is CRUCIAL in this recipe. I would highly recommend using an oven thermometer to make sure the internal temperature of your oven is exactly 300 degrees F. Variation in temperature will mess with your macaron cookie. When testing this recipe, my macarons were consistently under baked because the temperature of my over is 10 degrees below what it says on the oven dial.
  2. Use a kitchen scale and measure your ingredients in grams – I chose to weigh all my measurements for this recipe because you definitely want to be precise in your measurements. The more precise you are, the better your results will be. I’ve definitely tried using cups/US measurements for macarons, and it simply doesn’t work.
  3. Measure all your ingredients before you start mixing and baking – For me, getting organized and measuring out all my ingredients ahead of time helped me better focus on each step of the process. I wasn’t going back and forth trying to weigh things, then mixing, then going back to weighing.

Making these matcha macarons

  1. Sift your dry ingredients twice for the macaron cookies – The key to getting that smooth cookie surface is to sift your dry ingredients thoroughly. I found the best way to ensure that is to sift my dry ingredients twice. Once before I mix them together, and once before I combine my wet and dry ingredients. This also prevents the matcha powder from clumping. This is technique I use in most of my matcha recipes like in my matcha rice krispie treats or matcha fudge.
  2. Make sure your meringue is STIFF – This is absolutely crucial to good macaron cookies. A stiff meringue gives your macarons the necessary lift and airiness. A good test for “stiffness” is to invert your bowl and see if the meringue falls out. If it stays put, you’re good to go. Like I mentioned above, don’t over beat the mixture. You want it to just reach stiff peaks.
  3. Do not over mix your macaron batter – If you over mix your batter, you risk deflating your meringue. Mix the batter until it looks like molten lava. A good test for the batter is to scoop some up and try to draw an 8 with the batter. If you can draw an 8 without it breaking, it’s good to go.
  4. Pipe your batter vertically – The key to getting a perfect circular disc is to hold your piping bag vertically as you are piping your macarons.
  5. Use a silicone mat with a macaron template – Since I am new to piping macarons, having a silicone mat was so helpful for me. It helped with keeping each macaron size consistent. It also help provides a good surface to bake the macarons on. If you’re pretty good at piping, you can also use parchment paper instead of a silicone mat.
  6. Use a Ziploc bag if you don’t have a piping bag – I did not have piping bags on hand, so I just used Ziploc bags with a pastry tip to pipe my macarons.

Storing your matcha macarons

The best way to store your macarons is to store the macaron cookies and filling separately. Moisture from the filling will cause the cookie to become mushy. Macaron cookies can be stored at room temperature, and the filling should be stored in the fridge.

matcha macarons

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matcha macarons

Get the Recipe:
Matcha Macarons

A yummy recipe for matcha macarons with a matcha macaron cookie and vanilla buttercream filling
4.48 from 17 ratings

Ingredients
  

Matcha Macaron Cookies

Vanilla Buttercream Filling

Instructions
 

  • Sift the powdered sugar, almond flour, and matcha powder into a bowl. Mix until combined and set aside.
  • Next make your meringue. Use a hand mixer to whisk your eggs until soft peaks and small bubbles appear. Add the cream of tartar and 1/3 of the granulated sugar. Continue whisking and adding the sugar little by little. Whisk the eggs until you get a meringue with stiff peaks and a shiny white color. The best way to know if your meringue is done is to invert the bowl. If the meringue doesn't fall out, the meringue is done.
  • Sift the almond flour mixture from step 1 into the meringue. Use a spatula to fold the almond mixture into the meringue. Be careful not to deflate the meringue too much or over mix. The mixture is adequately combined once it has the consistency of molten lava. The best way to test if the mixture is done is to draw an 8 with the mixture.
  • Fill a piping bag with the mixture. Place a silicone mat on a baking sheet. Pipe circular discs that are ~1 inch in diameter. It's best to use a silicone mat with a macaron template to guide your piping.
  • After piping, smack your baking sheet on a flat surface 2 or 3 times to get rid of air bubbles. Let the macarons rest for 40 minutes at room temperature. Resting will allow the macarons to form a skin, so when you touch it, no batter comes off.
  • Preheat the oven to 300 degrees F.
  • Once the macarons have rested and formed that skin on the outside, bake them for 15-17 minutes in the center of the oven. The macarons should easily release from the silicone mat. If it’s still sticking, they’re not done yet. Throw them back in the oven for 1-2 more minutes before checking again.
  • Rest macarons for at least 30 minutes after baking.
  • While the macarons are resting, making the filling. Combine butter, milk, and vanilla extract in a bowl. Use a hand mixer to whisk until a fluffy, smooth mixture forms.
  • Add the powdered sugar and whisk until combined.
  • Now it's time to put together your macarons! Use a piping bag or Ziploc bag to pipe the filling onto the flat side of 1 cookie. Put another cookie, flat side down, on top of the filling. Repeat this process until the cookies or the filling is used up.
Serving: 1macaron, Calories: 79kcal, Carbohydrates: 14g, Protein: 2g, Fat: 2g, Saturated Fat: 1g, Cholesterol: 1mg, Sodium: 9mg, Potassium: 15mg, Fiber: 1g, Sugar: 13g, Vitamin A: 67IU, Calcium: 12mg, Iron: 1mg
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